Nebulize hydrogen peroxide at first onset of viral respiratory symptoms, including for Covid-19

Instructions for Hydrogen Peroxide Nebulizer Set Up

This information is for education purposes only, and is not medical advice or recommending any treatment.  You should discuss any potential treatments with your health care professional.

Items Needed

Pari Trek Compressor – one preferred desktop compressor, there are other brands

Mask with tubing to attach to nebulizer

Food Grade H2O2 – keep in frig to slow degradation

Sea Salt (or order a bottle of pre-made normal saline)

Optional — 5% Lugol’s iodine (Dr. David Brownstein’s nebulized peroxide protocol includes one drop of iodine to the final peroxide solution)

To Make Your Own Normal Saline (0.9 %):

Dilution:

Fill 16 oz. jar with 16 ounces of pure clean water

4.5 grams of sea salt/16 0z = 1 level  teaspoon of salt (Himalayan sea salt)

Dissolve 1 teaspoon of sea salt in water

To Make 0.1% hydrogen peroxide (hp) solution:

Add three-quarters of a  teaspoon of 12% Food grade hydrogen peroxide to the 16 oz of normal saline, ¼ teaspoon at a time.

This creates 0.1% hydrogen peroxide in normal saline

Label it!

Can transfer to a dropper bottle.

Put about ½ teaspoon (about 3 cc) of 0.1% hp in the nebulizer

Place mask on nebulizer

Plug into compressor and turn compressor on

Place mask over nose and mouth and breathe in and out normally until there is no more mist (hp has been used up)

If very sick, treat every hour. When better every 4 to 6 hours.

Watch this video demonstration:

Dr. Marquis video using store bought 3% hydrogen peroxide

The above is the summary of how to prepare and use hydrogen peroxide nebulizer program.

For more details from other doctors continue to read below.

From Dr. Mercola:

“How to Prepare Your Nebulizing Solution

One of the most important parts of the treatment, however, is to make sure you have the equipment BEFORE you need it. So, if you haven’t already purchased your nebulizer supplies, please put that on your to-do list now. To be prepared for any eventuality, you’ll want to buy the following items so that you have them on hand:

The peroxide needs to be diluted with saline, not tap water or distilled water, as this could potentially inflame the mucosal cells. You need the salt in there. As noted by Levy, “The literature shows that water by itself does aggravate, or can cause, an irritating cough if you nebulize it by itself.”

  • An electric, plug-in tabletop jet nebulizer (small battery-driven hand-held devices tend to be ineffective due to their reduced power)
  • Food-grade hydrogen peroxide (which does not contain any harmful stabilizers)
  • Normal saline (0.9%) solution (alternatively, you can easily make your own at home)

I recommend diluting the peroxide down to 0.1%. Brownstein recommends using an ultralow dilution of 0.04% while Levy recommends 3% or less, depending on individual patient tolerance and how sick the patient already is.

If you don’t have access to saline, you could make your own by mixing one teaspoon of unprocessed salt (such as Himalayan salt, Celtic salt or Redmond’s real salt) into a pint of distilled water. This will give you a 0.9% saline solution, which is about the concentration found in body fluids. Using that saline, you will then dilute the hydrogen peroxide as described in this chart.

Dr. Levy’s comments about the dilution of HP to use:

With regard to the dilution, Levy offers the following commentary:

“I don’t think there’s any evidence really that 0.04% nebulization as a monotherapy is going to get the job done. I want something that anybody on the planet can use to resolve [their infection] without having to add vitamin C, without having to add iodine, without having availability of ozone.

And when you start taking the concentration down, you’re going to get less antipathogenic impact by definition. That, combined with the fact that for a year now, I’ve been getting an incredible amount of positive feedback. I’ve had no negative feedback. Most people use 3%. Some get too much tingling in the nose and they’ll go down to 1.5% or even 1%.

I think it’s a whole different thing as to what concentration you might want to use for the maintenance therapy that we’re talking about. But I think there’s no good reason at all not to take your first shot at 3% when you’re already having symptoms, or if you have a COVID-positive test.

I see no reason to dance lightly, especially in the fact that we have no negative feedback. Also, a recent article showed that people who routinely gargle with 3% peroxide show zero microscopic abnormalities in the tissue after a six-month period …

I never advise somebody to tolerate symptoms that they find uncomfortable. I always say, find a concentration of whatever you’re nebulizing that’s comfortable. But that said, I still think when you clearly have an infection, hit it hard the first few times, I don’t think you’re going to do any damage.”

References:

This information is for education purposes only, and is not medical advice or recommending any treatment.  You should discuss any potential treatments with your health care professional.

About Dr. Jo

Dr. JoDr. Jo delights in sharing the message of health. She believes disease is optional if you know how to take care of yourself. And she’s a great coach to help you reverse or prevent disease.

So she writes this blog to keep you up to date with information that may undermine your health if you are not aware of it. She also provides tips on healthy living, how to reverse degenerative diseases, delicious recipes, and ways to enjoyably change your habits to healthy ones.

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